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How to help the monarch butterfly now that they’re listed as endangered


INJURIES. THE SPEEDBOAT REPORTEDLY TOOK OFF AFTER THE COLLISION.. THE MONARCH BUTTERFLY IS NOW CONSIDERED AN ENDANGERED SPECIES.. BUT THERE IS SOMETHING THAT CAN BE DONE TO HELP MONARCH BUTTERFLIES THRIVE DESPITE THE CHALLENGES. ACTION NEWS 8 REPORTER áMICHELLE GILEá HAS THE STORY. IT’S HARD TO BELIEVE THAT CERTAIN POPULATIONS OF THE MONARCH BUTTERFLY WITH THEIR RECOGNIZABLE ORANGE AND BLACK WINGS COULD SOON BE EXTINCT.. (SOT) I THINK IT’S FRIGHTENING BUT THAT’S WHAT EXPERTS ARE SAYING IF SOMETHING ISN’T DONE TO SAVE THESE GRACEFUL INSECTS WHOSE NUMBERS IN CALIFORNIA ARE IN STEADY DECLINE. :22(SOT)SARAH SMITH- ROGER’S GARDENS HORTICULTURIST IN THE 80’S, WE HAD OVER 10 MILLION OF THEM.. IN 2021 WHEN THEY DID THE COUNT THERE WAS ONLY 2,000 OF THEM… TODAY THE INTERNATIONAL UNION FOR CONSERVATION OF NATURE PUT THE NORTH AMERICAN MONARCH ON THE ENDANGERED LIST WHICH IS TWO STEPS AWAY FROM EXTINCTION. ;40 (SOT) DOUG YANEGA- UC RIVERSIDE ETYMOLOGIST MOSTLY BECAUSE OF THE DESTRUCTION OF THEIR OVERWINTERING HABITAT WHICH IS IN MEXICO AND THERE’S PROBLEMS THEY’LL HAVE MAKING THE TRIP INTO NORTH AMERICA AND BACK TO MEXICO AT THE END OF THE YEAR..THERE’S A LOT OF THINGS THAT THEY HAVE TO RUN IN TERMS OF GAUNTLETS. AND THE MILKWEED PROBLEM IS ANOTHER KEY ISSUE, ACCORDING TO HORTICULTURIST SARAH SMITH AT ROGER’S GARDENS IN NEWPORT BEACH. (SOT) SAVING THE MONARCH IS A HIGH PRIORITY HERE. (NATS) EDUCATING PEOPLE THAT THERE’S A RIGHT AND A WRONG TYPE OF MILKWEED FOR THE GARDEN IS KEY TO NOT KILLING MONARCH BUTTERFLIES. (SOT) A MICROSCOPIC LITTLE PROTOZEA THAT’S GROWING ON MILKWEED THATS ENDANGERING THEM ITS GETTING INTO THEIR BODIES AND KILLING THEM SO ITS A PARASITE AND ITS ALL BECAUSE WE’VE BEEN PLANTING THE WRONG KIND OF MILKWEED FOR SO LONG. THE PRETTIER TROPICAL MILKWEED SOLD IN BRIGHT COLORS..ORANGE, RED, AND YELLOW IS A BIG NO NO..NATIVE MILKWEED WITH CREAMY WHITE O

How to help the monarch butterfly now that they’re listed as endangered

The monarch butterfly was classified as an endangered species by international conservations, Thursday, and is now one step closer to extinction.Over the past decade, the population has dropped between 22% to 72% globally. Monarchs east of the Rocky Mountain declined by 84% from 1996 to 2014. In the West, the population plummeted by 99.9%.The Central Coast is no stranger to the monarch butterfly. Santa Cruz and Pacific Grove are popular spots for the migrating butterflies to stop as they fly north from October to March.Monarchs need places to rest their wings, drink flower nectar, and lay their eggs on milkweed, which their baby caterpillars eat.How can residents of the Central Coast help the dwindling monarch population? Here’s what the National Wildlife Federation recommends:Help Save Grasslands — America’s native grasslands are critically important for monarchs. They offer both milkweed for monarch caterpillars as well as nectar plants for adult butterflies (and many other pollinators, too). Today, more than 90% of native grasslands have been converted to cropland and development. Grasslands are disappearing faster than any other ecosystem in North America, and that’s a big problem for monarchs. Join NWF in fighting to save grasslands for monarchs.Support Highway Habitat Corridor — NWF and USFWS are working to create a coalition of agriculture leaders and highway transportation organizations to plant milkweed and nectar plants along monarch migratory flyways and in other important monarch breeding grounds along key Midwest and Texas corridors. Learn more about highway habitat corridor plan and how to support it.Plant Milkweed — You can make saving the monarch personal by planting milkweed in your yard or garden. There are many milkweed species found in North America, so no matter where you live, there’s at least one species native to your area. You’ll be rewarded not only with the knowledge that you are making a difference, but by attracting monarchs to enjoy. Find out what milkweeds are from your region.Don’t Use Pesticides — Monarchs are insects, and so spraying insecticides will kill them. Make the commitment to avoid spraying pesticides in your yard. Find out how to garden organically.Create Monarch Habitat— NWF’s Garden for Wildlife program can teach you how to turn any outdoor space into a complete habitat for monarchs. Just provide food, water, cover and places to raise young. It all starts with what you plant and you can create a habitat garden in your own yard, at your office, at your church, or on the local school grounds. Entire communities are launching efforts to create monarch habitats. Learn how to create a wildlife-friendly garden.

The monarch butterfly was classified as an endangered species by international conservations, Thursday, and is now one step closer to extinction.

Over the past decade, the population has dropped between 22% to 72% globally. Monarchs east of the Rocky Mountain declined by 84% from 1996 to 2014. In the West, the population plummeted by 99.9%.

The Central Coast is no stranger to the monarch butterfly. Santa Cruz and Pacific Grove are popular spots for the migrating butterflies to stop as they fly north from October to March.

Monarchs need places to rest their wings, drink flower nectar, and lay their eggs on milkweed, which their baby caterpillars eat.

How can residents of the Central Coast help the dwindling monarch population? Here’s what the National Wildlife Federation recommends:

  1. Help Save Grasslands — America’s native grasslands are critically important for monarchs. They offer both milkweed for monarch caterpillars as well as nectar plants for adult butterflies (and many other pollinators, too). Today, more than 90% of native grasslands have been converted to cropland and development. Grasslands are disappearing faster than any other ecosystem in North America, and that’s a big problem for monarchs. Join NWF in fighting to save grasslands for monarchs.
  2. Support Highway Habitat Corridor — NWF and USFWS are working to create a coalition of agriculture leaders and highway transportation organizations to plant milkweed and nectar plants along monarch migratory flyways and in other important monarch breeding grounds along key Midwest and Texas corridors. Learn more about highway habitat corridor plan and how to support it.
  3. Plant Milkweed — You can make saving the monarch personal by planting milkweed in your yard or garden. There are many milkweed species found in North America, so no matter where you live, there’s at least one species native to your area. You’ll be rewarded not only with the knowledge that you are making a difference, but by attracting monarchs to enjoy. Find out what milkweeds are from your region.
  4. Don’t Use Pesticides — Monarchs are insects, and so spraying insecticides will kill them. Make the commitment to avoid spraying pesticides in your yard. Find out how to garden organically.
  5. Create Monarch Habitat— NWF’s Garden for Wildlife program can teach you how to turn any outdoor space into a complete habitat for monarchs. Just provide food, water, cover and places to raise young. It all starts with what you plant and you can create a habitat garden in your own yard, at your office, at your church, or on the local school grounds. Entire communities are launching efforts to create monarch habitats. Learn how to create a wildlife-friendly garden.



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